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permutationofninjas:

r/MensRights Demographics Survey (April 2014)

theclitocracy:

Okay but if you go onto the Mens Rights reddit (I mean I don’t encourage this, my brain cell count just plummeted), and find their post discussing it apparently bots went through the survey and put all the same answers thousands of times. And it seems legit. So I mean I’m all for laughing at the fact that the people on r/MensRights are very very similar in a ridiculous way, but only if that’s true… which it probably is but this data is massively fucked.

First, we’d like to thank you for apparently being the only person to reblog this post with any level of common sense.

The issue you’ve mentioned (see the post here) is actually trivially obvious when you compare to their (relatively clean) results from last year.  Unless the subreddit exploded over the last 9 months with thousands of identical clones who’re all under-20 white male atheist strong conservatives who support marijuana legalization and nothing else, it’s pretty clear that the survey was sabotaged by a (probably feminist) asshole with a voting bot.  Most particularly, note a complete reversal in supposed political affiliation.  The prior survey was dominated by independents, with libertarians and democrats in similar numbers and republicans trailing at a measly 7%, whereas this survey is overwhelmingly “strong conservative.”

When we ignore the single anomalous vote pattern (and, with that in mind, consider the potential for other similar behaviors), the demographics seem reasonably congruent with the prior survey.

So is /r/MR really that homogeneous?  Well, sort of, something we can discuss using the prior survey.  The people on /r/MR are indeed pretty similar, but aside from gender they seem to be demographically representative of their countries and Reddit itself.  While it might seem odd that they’re mostly white, a quick look at the location demographics shows otherwise: 57% from the U.S. (~73% white), 13.5% from Canada (~86% white), 8.5% from the U.K. (~87% white), and 4.8% from Australia (~92% white).  Of the remaining 16%, the vast majority were apparently from various European countries which are (surprise surprise), overwhelmingly white.  So sure, the /r/MR crowd is mostly white, but only because they’re from countries that are mostly white.

They peak in the 18-34 age range, which is exactly what we’d expect from Reddit, and while somewhat above the U.S. average span the gamut of education.  They’re mostly (~70%) unmarried, which isn’t a surprise either: median age of first marriage for the countries in question ranges from 28 to 32, and about 56% of the population falls into the under-25 demographic.  They’re indeed largely (~60%) atheist, but this is likewise neither a surprise when looking at young people or Redditors.  Despite the paucity of Christians, there are about as many Jews, Muslims and Hindus as would be expected geographically, and the “Other” category isn’t possible to examine.  The only other truly unexpected result was the sexuality demographics, which showed a relatively high 20% as non-heterosexual.

To make a long story short, /r/MR is only as similar as we’d expect them to be based on their location and the makeup of Reddit as a whole.

While the surveys aren’t precisely analogous, it’s also possible to draw some comparisons between the old /r/MR results and the new results from /r/feminism.  According to the survey, /r/feminism has a slightly less extreme gender ratio, unsurprising considering the social prevalence of feminism.  The racial demographics are similar, and still strongly white.  Interestingly, blacks make up a similar portion than all other minorities combined, while in /r/MR they were the smallest group (in order of size, “Other”>Hispanic>Asian>Black).  If we remove them from both surveys the overall minority ratio comes out the same, which suggests a small-number skew.  (Basically, because the /r/feminism response pool was around 1/3 the size of the /r/MR one and very small in general it’s easy for small fluctuations to throw things off.)

The age range is very similar, and the responses on religion are comparable: very high atheism, high Christianity, with others trailing behind.  Oddly, while /r/feminism has a noticeably lower percentage of Christians they have a much higher percentage of Muslims, though again this runs into small-number issues.  Finally, /r/feminism shows a clear skew towards liberalism (70%), which compares to /r/MR’s more independent leanings.

However, the recent /r/feminism data can’t be fully trusted either.  While it’s unlikely there was significant brigading from /r/MR, it’s not unlikely that at least some people answered (or refrained from answering) in such a way as to purposefully skew the data in a direction they felt would appear positive.

Returning to the /r/MR survey, it’s pretty clear that a bare minimum of 2400 responses are the result of an automated bot.  According to the survey author, the responses seemed questionable even before that, and at this point we have to throw out the survey as a whole.  Let’s be honest, neither feminists nor SRSers are above such behavior, which is pretty ironic since all they’ve done is guarantee anyone with a brain will throw out the results entirely: either they were (arguably correctly) scared that the results wouldn’t fit their prejudices, or they’ve passed up a great opportunity to prove they do.  So yeah, nicely done on their part.

As for the rest of you who’ve uncritically reblogged this crap without bothering to check the numbers….how fucking dumb are you people?

(Source: shitrichcollegekidssay)

21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You’re Depressed.


A while ago, I penned a fairly angry response to something circulating on the internet – the 21 Habits of Happy People. It pissed me off beyond belief, that there was an inference that if you weren’t Happy, you simply weren’t doing the right things.

I’ve had depression for as long as I can remember. It’s manifested in different ways. I did therapy. I did prozac. I did more therapy. My baseline is melancholic. I’d just made peace with it when I moved, unintentionally, to a place that had markedly less sunshine in the winter. I got seasonal depression. I got that under control. Then I got really, really sick. Turns out it’s a permanent, painful genetic disorder. My last pain-free day was four years ago.

So, this Cult of Happy article just set me off. Just… anger. Rage. Depression is serious – debilitating, often dangerous, and it’s got an enormous stigma. It leaves people to fend for themselves.

It’s bad enough without people ramming Happy Tips at you through facebook. There is no miracle behaviour change that will flip that switch for you. I know, I’ve tried.

A friend of mine suggested that I write something from my point of view because, surprisingly, I manage to give an outwards impression of having my shit together. I was shocked to hear this. And I find this comical, but I see her point. I’m functioning. I’ve adapted. I’m surprisingly okay. I think the medical term is “resilient”.

So, here it is.

My 21 Tips on Keeping Your Shit Together During Depression

1) Know that you’re not alone. Know that we are a silent legion, who, every day face the solipsism and judgement of Happy People Who Think We Just Aren’t Trying. There are people who are depressed, people who have been depressed, and people who just haven’t been hit with it yet.

2) Understand that the Happy People are usually acting out of some genuine (albeit misguided) concern for you, that it’s coming from a good place, even if the advice feels like you’re being blamed for your disease. Telling you these things makes them feel better, even if it makes you feel like shit. (If they insist on keeping it up, see #12.)

3) Enlist the help of a professional. See your doctor. You need to talk about the ugly shit, and there are people paid to listen and help you find your way to the light at the end of the tunnel.

4) Understand that antidepressants will only do so much. They’re useful, they’ll level you out and give you the time you need to figure out your own path to getting well. They can be helpful. There are lots to choose from. They may not be for you, and even if they are, they take some time to kick in. Conversely, they may not be for you. Work with your doctor.

5) Pick up a paintbrush, a pencil, an activity you got joy from in the past and re-explore that. Or, sign up for the thing you always wanted to try. There is a long history and link between depression and creativity. It’s a bright light of this condition, so utilize it to your best advantage.

6) Eat nutritionally sound, regular small meals. If you’re having trouble eating, try to focus on what you’d like to eat. I went through a whole six week episode of tomatoes and cream cheese on a bagel twice a day. Not great, but it was something – helpful context, I’m a recovered anorexic. Conversely, if all you want to do is scarf down crap, try to off-ramp it by downing a V-8 and doing #9 for 15 minutes, and see how you feel. Chucking your blood sugar all over hell’s half acre is going to make you feel worse.

7) While you’re doing #3, get some bloodwork done. If you’re low on iron or vitamin D, or if your hormone levels are doing the Macarena… these can all contribute to zapping your energy or switching your mood to Bleak As Hell.

8) If you’re in bed and the “insomnia hamsters”, as I like to call them, are on the wheel of your head, watch Nightly Business News on PBS. This has the effect of Nyquil. Swap out your coffee for herbal tea. If you just cannot sleep, try the next tip….

9) Learn how to meditate. Start by focusing on your breathing. Not sleep, not thoughts. In through the nose, out through the mouth. Meditation is focusing on being present in your body, not careening around in your brain. It may not be as good as sleep but it will give you some rest and recharge you.

10) Face a window as often as you can – at work, at home. Look out into the world. Watch. Observe. Try to find something you find pretty or interesting to focus on. And, handily remember that one in five of those people out there feel the way you do.

11) Cry. Better out than in. Sometimes it’s not convenient or career-enhancing to cry, so find a private place as best you can and let the tears go. Carry Kleenex and face wipes and extra concealer if you wear makeup. You can always claim allergies.

12) Any “friend” who resolutely believes that your depression is because you’re lazy, because you’re not trying hard enough, who blames you for not bootstrapping out of it- that friend needs to be cut off. Polite (#2) is one thing, but there is a limit. You don’t have to explain, you can just not respond. You feel badly enough, you don’t need their “assistance”.

13) Limit your time with people who drain you. You know who they are. Often you don’t have a choice- but you can put the meter on. And, subsequently, be aware of what you’re asking of those close to you.

14) Everyone has shit they’ve got to deal with. What you have been saddled with is your shit. Recognize, just as you’re not alone, you’re also not unique. The grass may look greener, you may be jealous or envious of others who don’t have to deal with depression, but you likely do not know everything that’s going on with them.

15) Let go or be dragged. This is an old Buddhist saying. It’s a very useful way to frame aspects of depression. Betrayal, anger, fear… letting go is a process – often a painful and difficult process - but it’s ultimately going to show you the path out of this terrible place. Repeating the mantra can help when you’re feeling gripped by these feelings.

16) Wear clothes that make you feel confident. It takes as much time to put on nice clothes as it does to put on sweatpants. You will want to wear the sweatpants. Fight the urge. The whole “look good/feel better” campaign isn’t limited to cancer and chemotherapy. Or women.

17) Avoid fictional drama and tragedy like the plague. No Grey’s Anatomy, no to The Notebook, or anything that won a Pulitzer prize. You’ve got enough going on In Real Life. Comedy only. Or trashy stuff. Old episodes of WonderWoman? I’ve got the box set. Mindless drivel, like the latest CGI blockbuster. Or clever, funny books. David Sedaris. Jenny Lawson. Fiction exists to elicit emotion, and the emotion you need to express most right now is laughter.

18) Simple exercise, if you can. It can be something as simple as taking the stairs up a flight, or walking around the block. It doesn’t have to be elaborate, it doesn’t have to involve climbing a mountain or running a marathon. Baby steps.

19) Depression will lie to you. Depression will try to tell you what others are thinking. That you are unloved and unworthy, that others think little of you or don’t care – or even wish you harm. You are not a psychic. Keep repeating that. “I am not a psychic”. Repeat. The only way to know what another person is thinking is to up and ask them.

20) If you are well and truly losing this battle, reach out to someone. I’ve been the random friendly-but-not-close person who has fielded the occasional outreach. I like to think I’m not judgemental and generally resourceful, and others have thought the same, so they called and asked. You know someone like me. And they will help you.

21) Forgive yourself. I’m writing out all these tips, and I can’t always muster the strength to even stick my nose outside, or walk up the stairs, or eat my vegetables. Today, I got outside for ten minutes. I will try again tomorrow. And I will try again the day after that.

Broaching the topic of “White Privilege” is not synonymous with “All white people are evil and, I hate them all.” Chill out.

Want to watch a white person rush away from a dinner party? Just bust out phrases like “institutionalized racism,” “white supremacy,” and the oldie but goodie “residual effects of slavery that are still with us today,” and watch a room of white people clear itself out, or, at least, have them stammer out the names of all the black people they are friends with, and then offer another unsolicited list off all the good they’ve done for people of color.

When I talk about systemic racism and historical racial inequalities as it ties into white privilege and modern-day racism, I think I must sound like this to white people: “Hey Whitey! I am going to kill you.” I know this is a lot to ask of white people, but could you please STOP FLIPPING OUT when the topic of white privilege comes up? I’m talking about being defensive, blabbing about how there is no such thing as race (just one human race, which is actually made up of different races), and how you are so gifted as a white person that you “don’t see race.” Ooh, that last one, ouch.

That’s why we need to have this conversation — because the inability to “see” racism and privilege is exactly what white privilege is. Talking about race is not a trap. It’s not a game of “Gotcha with your Klan Hood Down.” Talking about white privilege is not about asking white people to leave their race. Nor is it about declaring genocide on the white race. (Besides, looks like we’re already going to outnumber you by 2050, so you might as well sit back, relax and enjoy being Wong-splained.)

Talking about white privilege is not even about trying to make you feel like shit for being white. Surprising, I know. But the conversation on white privilege concerns you and yet is not about YOU. And when you make it about how you feel personally attacked, we really don’t progress further into talking about how we’re going to fix racism. Really.

If you are a white person who gets nervous when white privilege gets brought up, imagine having to navigating racism in every day life as a person of color who must live with it. Imagine systemically being locked out of better education or healthcare, job opportunities or the mainstream American narrative.

There are moments as an Asian American when I’ve been regarded as an “honorary white.” (There are also many other moments when I am reminded that I will always be a perpetual foreigner despite the fact that my family has been in the United States for three generations.) But rather than take whatever privilege I can and run with it, I’m interested in talking with people who benefit from white privilege -– how and if they can recognize it and use their positions of privilege to dismantle the systems that oppress other people.

Believe it or not, I’d love for the world to be more equitable for EVERYONE. And when I ask you to recognize your white privilege, it’s not because I’m trying to place blame. It’s about asking white people to consider the moments where they are able to “pass” in certain situations. Where they are afforded privileges that they never earned. It’s about finding ways to cede privilege, space, and comfort to allow others to live in a more equitable world.

So white people, the conversation about race can’t happen without you. We can’t get things better if we aren’t all talking. If racism were an easy problem to fix, we would have fixed it already. Ending racism starts with recognizing privilege, systemic control over society at large, and when you are dismissing issues of racism then you have the privilege of being oblivious to.

Don’t get me wrong there are people of color who proclaim to drink the tears of white people. There are anti-racism activists who will never organize with the most “down” of white people. I don’t want to drink your white tears, but I’d be lying if I said that I don’t enjoy watching you squirm a little.

Come on, you got to give me that.
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Comics, I kind of hate you right now

gimpnelly:

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my…

I wouldn’t necessarily mind people not knowing I’m gay, but I don’t like being thought of as straight — in the same way that I don’t mind people not knowing I’m a writer, but it would be awkward if they assumed I was an extreme skateboarder, because that’s so far removed from the reality of my life. But there is no blank slate where orientation is concerned; we are straight until proven otherwise. And if you’ve never seen how dramatically a conversation can be derailed by a casual admission of homosexuality, let me tell you, it gets awkward.

silvermoon424:

Source

Hey, guys, here’s a list of the major websites that were impacted by the Heartbleed bug and what their current status is (this was created only a few hours ago so it’s up-to-date). Thankfully, the most important site of all (meaning, the site that would really fuck you over if it was hacked into), PayPal, was never vulnerable in the first place, so if you use PayPal, your credit card and bank account information has always been safe.

(via inkytasty)

jezunya:


[x]
Of course, the majority of the responding tweets were from men denying the idea that there’s any sexism in the tech industries, saying that women’s individual stories and all the statistics about low female-to-male ratios and high occurrences of harassment are all biased or exaggerated, or else admitting that yeah, all that’s true, but women just need to be patient and wait for things to get better, someday, somehow, without any need for anyone to acknowledge that it’s a problem, much less do anything about it.



From the most recent Codeless Code


“Why are there so few women in this temple?” asked the novice monk.

“Because very few girls apply for admittance anymore,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because it is widely known that most girls do not meet our rigorous standards,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because productivity requires harmony, and many female applicants are a poor fit for our culture,” replied the abbot. “Indeed, most have wasted the time we invested in them by leaving soon after arriving.”

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because they were unhappy here, and did not work well with the monks,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because like so many great temples, the culture of this temple is a boy’s culture: rough and rude, cruel and crude, in work and in play,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because there are so few women in this temple,” replied the abbot.

jezunya:

[x]

Of course, the majority of the responding tweets were from men denying the idea that there’s any sexism in the tech industries, saying that women’s individual stories and all the statistics about low female-to-male ratios and high occurrences of harassment are all biased or exaggerated, or else admitting that yeah, all that’s true, but women just need to be patient and wait for things to get better, someday, somehow, without any need for anyone to acknowledge that it’s a problem, much less do anything about it.

From the most recent Codeless Code

“Why are there so few women in this temple?” asked the novice monk.

“Because very few girls apply for admittance anymore,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because it is widely known that most girls do not meet our rigorous standards,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because productivity requires harmony, and many female applicants are a poor fit for our culture,” replied the abbot. “Indeed, most have wasted the time we invested in them by leaving soon after arriving.”

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because they were unhappy here, and did not work well with the monks,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because like so many great temples, the culture of this temple is a boy’s culture: rough and rude, cruel and crude, in work and in play,” replied the abbot.

“Why is that?” asked the novice monk.

“Because there are so few women in this temple,” replied the abbot.

(via madmaudlingoes)